Feed aggregator

160710_0184

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0177

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0174

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0172

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0162

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0167

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0161

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0156

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0146

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0145

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0141

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0139

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0132

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

160710_0124

MN Flickr - 6 hours 1 min ago

MinneapolisBicycleCoalition posted a photo:

Categories: Minnesnota

How to behave in an elevator

BoingBoing - 6 hours 2 min ago

Psychologist Lane Longfellow is the go-to expert on how people behave in elevators. After years of research, Longfellow came up with a simple guide to "How to Behave in an Elevator," including suggestions like "face forward," "watch the numbers," and "stop talking with anyone you do know when anyone enters the elevator." While learning about Longfellow, Alex at Weird Universe compiled a collection of fascinating nuggets from ongoing research in this area:

• Studies of elevator body placement show a standard pattern. Normally the first person on grabs the corner by the buttons or a corner in the rear. The next passenger takes a catercorner position. Then the remaining corners are seized, and next the mid-rear-wall and the center of the car. Then packing becomes indiscriminate.

• "When the sixth person gets on you can watch the shuffle start," says Longfellow. "People don't quite know what to do with the sixth person. Then another set of rules comes into play governing body contact."

• In an uncrowded elevator, men stand with hands folded in front or women will hold their purses in front. That's called the Fig Leaf Position. Longfellow says, "As it gets more crowded you can see hands unfold and come down to the sides, because if you have your hands folded in front of you in a really crowded elevator, there's no telling where your knuckles might end up. So out of respect for the privacy of other people you unfold them and put them at your side."

• High-status individuals are given more space. For instance, if the president of the company gets on, he gets more space.

• Men leave more space between themselves and other men than women do with other women.

"Elevator Proxemics" (Weird Universe)

Categories: Crunknet

Satirist Paul Thomas mixes fiction with facts in An Unreliable History of Tattoos

BoingBoing - 6 hours 8 min ago

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

An Unreliable History of Tattoos
by Paul Thomas
Nobrow Press
2016, 96 pages, 7.9 x 10.6 x 0.7 inches (hardcover)
$3 Buy a copy on Amazon

A minor celebrity/reality star, whose name I can’t remember, said in a recent interview that she thinks of people without tattoos as being “unicorns” because they are so rare. It’s true that today tattoos are much more popular than when I was a kid. In my day, only sailors or criminals had dye permanently etched into their bodies, but according to the graphic novel, An Unreliable History of Tattoos, inking people has been around since Day 1 (think Adam and Eve).

In his first book, award-winning British political cartoonist Paul Thomas loosely traces the origins of body art. There’s definitely a focus on European (and specifically British) history in this book, but Thomas also pokes fun at a few famous Americans. Mixing fiction with facts, (honestly sometimes it’s hard to tell what’s real and what’s made up) this book is interesting, humorous, and very unusual!

I don’t know if the Upper Paleolithic man really punctured his skin with blunt twigs, nor do I know if King Harold II had his wife Edith’s name tattooed on his chest way back in 1066. Should I believe Anne Boleyn’s daughter, Princess Elizabeth, had her knuckles tattooed? Was Kings Charles II’s chest covered in permanent ink with names of all his many bedroom conquests? According to this parody, Queen Victoria, Sir Winston Churchill, and even President Obama love body art too. An Unreliable History of Tattoos also touches on Japanese, Greek, Roman and Viking ink. If any, or all, or some of the fun facts in An Unreliable History of Tattoos are true, the thorny roses, tribal arm sleeves, and Mickey Mouse heads that show up on today’s bodies are nothing compared to what came before them. – Carole Rosner

Categories: Crunknet

Joe Hart: Torino set to announce signing of Man City goalkeeper on deadline day

BBC UK Ed. - 6 hours 19 min ago
Serie A side Torino are set to announce the loan signing of Manchester City goalkeeper Joe Hart after he arrived in Italy for a medical.
Categories: MediaTorrent

Florida fishers are catching and eating the highly invasive lionfish

BoingBoing - 6 hours 25 min ago

Lion fish are a serious invasive threat along the southern Atlantic coast. Extremely aggressive, lion fish eat a lot of other fish. Fishery managers suggest we eat them!

No Florida man joke, sorry.

Categories: Crunknet

Jack Kirby's long-lost, incomplete "The Prisoner" comic book

BoingBoing - 6 hours 27 min ago

Forces of Geek has unearthed an amazing gem. To introduce it, they write: In the March 21st, Entertainment Weekly ran an article called In Search of Pop Culture’s Holy Grails, listing, “some hallowed projects (that) evade(d) our grasp. A guide to our great white whales.” Over two dozen, “lost” projects are listed. But in the FOG! world of pop culture, not everything is lost. So, in the coming weeks, we’re going to uncover a number of those projects, including our first, Jack Kirby’s The Prisoner, which EW describes as, “a comic based on the gonzo sci-fi show. Kirby never finished issue No. 1.”

Read the rest of the issue here. And, as FOG points out, it appears that the issue was actually complete, except for some final lettering and inking by Mike Royer.

[H/t Chris Burke]

Categories: Crunknet

22-year-old Elizabeth Taylor on What's My Line

BoingBoing - 6 hours 29 min ago

https://youtu.be/mw8WK3AaRJU?t=16m01s

Great episode of What's my Line from 1964 in which Elizabeth Taylor uses a squeaky voice in an attempt to trick the blindfolded panelists.

Categories: Crunknet
Syndicate content